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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Clementine Deymann

Franciscan; b. at Klein-Stavern, Oldenburg, Germany, June 24, 1844; d. at Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A., December 4, 1896

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Deymann, CLEMENTINE, b. at Klein-Stavern, Olden-burg, Germany, June 24, 1844; d. at Phcenix, Arizona, U.S.A., December 4, 1896. He came to America with his parents in 1863, studied at Teutopolis, Illinois, received the habit of St. Francis and the name Clementine at the same place, December 8, 1867, finished his theological studies, and was ordained priest at St. Louis, Missouri, May 19, 1872. Father Clementine was stationed as professor at the college of Teutopolis until July, 1879, when he was transferred to Joliet, to act as chaplain of the State prison. At Joliet he was also spiritual director of the School Sisters of St. Francis. In August, 1880, he was appointed superior and pastor of the German parish of Joliet, and in July, 1882, he received a like position at Chillicothe, Missouri. In 1885 and in 1891 Father Clementine was elected definitor of the Franciscan province of the Sacred Heart; in 1886 he was made superior of the boys’ orphanage at Watsonville, California. He was appointed July 22, 1896, the first commissary for the newly erected Franciscan commissariat of the Pacific Coast, but died shortly after receiving this office and was buried at Santa Barbara. Father Clementine was a very industrious man, who in his spare time translated a number of useful works, some of which have been published. Among these are: “The Seraphic Octave“, or “Retreat” (1883); “Life of St. Francisco Solano”; “Life of Blessed Crescentia Hoess”; “May Devotions” (1884). His original writings are: “Manual for the Sisters of the Third Order” (1884); “St. Francis Manual” (1884). He also wrote for several periodicals, and left in manuscript translations from the Spanish of the lives of Father Junipero Serra and Father Antonio Margil.

ZEPHYRIN ENGLEHARDT


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