Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Acciajuoli

Name of three cardinals belonging to an illustrious Florentine family

Click to enlarge

Acciajuoli, name of three cardinals belonging to an illustrious Florentine family of this name.—ANGELO, noted for his learning, experience, and integrity, b. 1349; d. at Pisa, May 31, 1408. He was made Archbishop of Florence in 1383, and Cardinal in 1385, by Pope Urban VI. He resisted all endeavors that were made to bring him over to the Antipope, Clement VII, and defended by word and deed the regularity of the election of Urban VI. After this Pope‘s death, half the votes in the succeeding conclave were for Acciajuoli; but to end the schism, he directed the election towards Boniface IX. The new Pope made him CardinalBishop of Ostia, and sent him to Germany, Slavonia, and Bulgaria to settle difficulties there. He afterwards became Governor of Naples, and guardian of the young King Ladislaus, whom he brought to Naples, and some time later accompanied on his march into Hungary. On his return he reconciled the Pope with the Orsini, and reformed the Benedictine monastery of St. Paul in Rome. He died on his way to Pisa, and was buried in Florence, at the Certosa, a monastic foundation of his family.—NICCOLO, b. at Florence, 1630; d. in Rome, February 23, 1719, as CardinalBishop of Ostia, in his eighty-ninth year.—FILIPPO, b. in Rome, March 12, 1700. He was nuncio in Portugal, but was expelled with military force by Pombal (August, 1760) because of his interference in behalf of the Jesuits. Clement XIII made him Cardinal in 1759; he died at Ancona, as Bishop of that see, July 4, 1766 (Duhr, Pombal, 1891, 121 sqq.).

JOHN J. A’ BECKET.


Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us