Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Is there a difference among conservative, orthodox, and traditional Catholics?

Question:

Traditional, orthodox, conservative? What’s the difference? Is there some formal definition of these as they relate to Catholicism? I am so confused now as to who I am.

Answer:

The terms have different emphases, but you will find no “formal definition” for them. “Traditional” suggests a preference for older liturgical and devotional styles; a similar word, “Traditionalist,” has a somewhat different emphasis and is used to label those intent on restoring the old Latin Mass. One can be “traditional” without being “Traditionalist” in that sense. “Orthodox” means “having the right opinion,” and everyone should strive to be that; it’s a handy word when used in contradistinction to “heterodox, ” which means “having a different opinion (from the official teaching). ” “Conservative” is a political term injected into religion, and I recommend against using it if some other word will convey your point.

Final advice: Don’t worry about trying to pigeonhole yourself. Learn to be satisfied with just calling yourself “Catholic. “

Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us