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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Veit Erbermann

Theologian and controversialist, b. May 25, 1597, d. April 8, 1675

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Erbermann (EBERMANN), VEIT, theologian and controversialist, b. May 25, 1597, at Rendweisdorff, in Bavaria; d. April 8, 1675. He was born of Lutheran parents, but at an early age he became a Catholic, and on May 30, 1620, entered the Society of Jesus. After completing his ecclesiastical studies he taught philosophy and Scholastic theology, first at Mainz and afterwards at Wurzburg. Subsequently he was appointed rector of the pontifical seminary at Fulda, which position he held for seven years. His theological attainments and zeal for the Church brought him into conflict with many of the leading Reformers of his time. He watched with a keen interest what in Protestant theological circles is known as “the syncretistic controversy”, and in his frequent encounters with its chief representatives proved himself an able champion of Catholicism. His principal works are: “Anatomia Calixtina” (Mainz, 1644), and “Irenicon Catholicum” (2 vols., Mainz, 1645-46), in which he examines critically the religious tenets of George Calixtus; “Interrogationes apologeticae” (Würzburg, 1651); “Examen Examinis Conringiani” (Würzburg, 1644), an exposition of the infallibility of the Church against H. Conring; “Anti-Musaeus, i.e. parallela Ecclesiae verse et falsae” (Würzburg,1659), and “Anti-Musaei pars altera” (Wurzburg 1661); “Asserta theologica de fide divina” (Würzburg, 1665).

JOSEPH SCHROEDER


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