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Society of the Divine Savior

Founded at Rome, 8 Dec., 1881, by Johann Baptist Jordan

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Divine Savior, SOCIETY OF the, founded at Rome, December 8, 1881, by Johann Baptist Jordan (b. 1848 at Gartweil im Breisgau), elected superior general as Father Francis Mary of the Cross. The original name, Society of Catholic Instruction, was changed some years after its foundation to the present title. The first papal approbation was granted in the “Decretum laudis” of May 27, 1905. The founder imposed on his congregation, in addition to the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, a fourth of apostolic mission work. The rules and constitutions are based largely on those of the Society of Jesus. The habit is black with a black cincture, in which four knots are tied to remind the wearer of his four vows. In tropical countries the habit is white and the cincture is red.

On December 13, 1889, the newly erected Prefecture Apostolic of Assam was placed in charge of the society, which has now 7 principal and 32 dependent stations, served by 13 missionaries, aided by 12 native catechists. The Fathers have published many books in the Khasi dialect, and since September, 1906, a periodical, “Ka Ting Khristan”. At Lochau, near Bregenz, a German college was established September 15, 1893; in the same year a station was founded at Corvallis, Oregon, U.S.A.; in 1896 several members began work in Brazil. At present (1908) missions are given in thirteen languages from the various centers. The Salvatorians have establishments in Italy, Sicily, Austria, Poland, Moravia, Galicia, Hungary, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, England, the United States, Brazil, and Colombia. The congregation numbers 400 members, 175 priests, the rest scholastics, lay brothers, and novices, in 35 foundations, of which 28 are Marian Colleges and 7 mission centers.

Among the periodicals issued by the society, in addition to the “Apostel-kalender” (in German and Hungarian), are the “Nuntius Romanus”, “11 Missionario” (in German “Der Missionar”, since 1907 “Illustrierte Monatshefte furs christl. Haus”; also in Polish), “L’amico dei fanciulli” (in German “Manna fur Kinder”; also in Polish), and the “Salvatorianische Mitteilungen” (German and Polish), containing reports of the work of the society. Connected with the society are a Third Order for lay men and women; the “Academia litteratorum”, the members of which cooperate with the fathers in the advancement of Catholic knowledge and literature; the Angel Sodality, founded December 8, 1664, for children under fourteen, which has as its organ “L’amico dei fanciulli”, and a membership of 40,000.

SISTERS OF THE DIVINE SAVIOUR, founded December 8, 1888, by Father Jordan, to supplement the work of the Salvatorian Fathers, and placed under the Third Rule of St. Francis. The mother-house is in Rome and there are stations in Assam (where the sisters conduct 6 orphan asylums), Austria, Hungary, Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, Sicily, British Burma, and in the United States. They conduct orphan asylums, kindergartens, and schools, and visit the sick in their homes. The congregation numbers about 200.

DAUGHTERS OF THE DIVINE SAVIOUR, mother-house at Vienna, a branch of the Niederbrunn Sisters of the Most Holy Savior, established 1857. The congregation has over 1200 sisters, choir and lay, who care for the sick in hospitals and in their own homes, and conduct schools for girls, primary and grammar schools, trade schools, kindergartens, etc. The sisters have 72 houses in the Dioceses of Vienna, St. Polten, Seckau, Koniggratz, Briinn, Gran, Raab, and Parenzo-Pola.

F. M. RUDGE


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