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Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Sebastian Redford

Jesuit; b. April 27, 1701; d. January 2, 1763

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Redford, SEBASTIAN, b. April 27, 1701; d. January 2, 1763. Educated at St. Omer, Watten, and Liege, he became a Jesuit and lived as chaplain with the Wrights of Kelvedon, then with the Herberts of Powis (1733-48). Redford was much trusted by the second Marquess of Powis (d. 1745), but the third was unfriendly. When he died (1748), a Protestant succeeded, the chaplaincy lapsed, and Redford had, as he says, “to rue the ruin” of his former flock. He was next stationed at Croxteth, the seat of Lord Molineux, where he published “An important Inquiry; or the Nature of Church Reformation ‘fully considered” (1751). The book was a success, but the excise officers seized and destroyed 400 copies, the last half of the edition. A second and enlarged edition appeared in 1758. Redford’s extant letters (preserved by the English Jesuits) show a strong and attractive personality, and throw some light on the period when most priests were chaplains in Catholic families.

J. H. POLLEN


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