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Remesiana

Titular see in Dacia Mediterranea, suffragan of Sardica

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Remesiana, titular see in Dacia Mediterranea, suffragan of Sardica. Remesiana is mentioned by the “Itinerarium Antonini” (135), the “Itinerarium Hierosolymitanum” (566), the “Tabula Peutingeriana”, the “Geographus Ravennatensis”, IV, vii. Justinian rebuilt and fortified it at the same time as he established numerous fortresses in that vicinity (Procopius, “De aedif.” IV, i, iv). In the sixth century this city of ancient Meesia was counted among those of Dacia Mediterranea (Hierocles, “Synecdemus”, dcliv, 7). Today it is known as Bela Palanka, has 1100 inhabitants, and is a railway station between Nich and Pirot in Servia. Remesiana was a suffragan of Sardica (today Sofia, capital of Bulgaria), the civil and religious capital of Dacia Mediterranea which was under the Patriarchate of Rome. Two bishops are known: Saint Nicetas (q.v.) and Diogenianus, present at the Robber Synod of Ephesus (449). The see must have disappeared in the sixth century.

S. PÉTRIDÉS


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