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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Raymond D’Agiles

Chronicler and canon of Puy-en-Velay, France, toward the close of the eleventh century

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Agiles (or AGUILERS), RAYMOND D’, a chronicler and canon of Puy-en-Velay, France, toward the close of the eleventh century. He accompanied the Count of Toulouse on the First Crusade (1096-99), as chaplain to Adhemar, Bishop of Puy, legate of Pope Urban II. With Pons de Balazuc he undertook to write a history of the expedition, but, Pons having been killed, he was obliged to carry on the undertaking alone. At a sortie of the crusaders during the siege of Antioch (June 28, 1098) Agiles went before the column, bearing in his hands the Sacred Lance. He took part in the entry into Jerusalem, accompanied the Count of Toulouse on his pilgrimage to the Jordan, and was at the battle of Ascalon. After this he is lost sight of his “Historia Francorum qui ceperunt Hierusalem” (P.L., CLV, 591-668) is the account of an eyewitness of most of the events of the First Crusade. It was first published by Bongars (Gesta Dei per Francos, I, 139-183), and again in the “Recueil des historiens occidentaux des croisades” (1866), 235-309; it is translated into French in Guizot, “Memoires sur l’histoire de France” (1824), XXI, 227-397. The narrative is largely devoted to the visions of Pierre Barthelemy, and the authenticity of the Holy Lance found on the eve of battle. Molinier says of the author that he is partial, credulous, ignorant, and prejudiced. “He may be utilized, but on condition of close criticism.”

THOMAS WALSH


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