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Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Prospero Alpini

Physician and botanist (1553-1617)

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Alpini, PROSPERO, physician and botanist, b. at Marostica, in the Republic of Venice, November 23, 1553; d. at Padua, February 6, 1617. He studied medicine at Padua from 1574 to 1578, taking his degree as doctor in the latter year. After two years spent at Campo San Pietro, he was appointed physician to the Venetian Consul in Egypt (1580), which gave him a much desired opportunity of pursuing his chosen study of botany under conditions more favorable than he could find in Italy, and of which he took the fullest possible advantage. On his return to Venice, in 1586, he became physician to Andre Doria, Prince of Melfi, and was looked upon in Genoa, where he resided, as the first physician of his age. He returned to Padua in 1593, where he filled the chair of botany for many years. He wrote a number of medical and botanical works in Latin, the most important being “De plantis Aegypti liber” (Venice, 1592). It is said that his earlier work, “De Medicina Aegyptiorum” (Venice, 1591) contains the first mention, by a European writer, of the coffee plant.

FRANCIS W. GREY


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