Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Philippe Alegambe

Jesuit historiographer, b. in Brussels, 22 January, 1592; d. in Rome, 6 September, 1652

Click to enlarge

Alegambe, PHILIPPE, a Jesuit historiographer, b. in Brussels, January 22, 1592; d. in Rome, September 6, 1652. After finishing his studies he went to Spain, in the service of the Duke of Osuna, whom he accompanied to Sicily. There he entered the Society of Jesus at Palermo, on September 7, 1613, studied at Rome, taught philosophy and theology at Gratz, Austria, and for several years travelled through the various countries of Europe as preceptor of the Prince of Eggenberg. His last days were spent in Rome, where he became superior of the house of the Jesuits, and secretary to the General of the Society. He is chiefly known for his “Bibliotheca Scriptorum Societatis Jesu”, published in 1642. It was a continuation and enlargement of Father Ribadeneira’s Catalogue, which had been brought up to 1608. He wrote also “Heroes et victimae caritatis Societatis Jesu” and “De Vita et Moribus P. Joannis Cardim Lusitani, e Societate Jesu”, and “Acta Sanctae Justae vir et mart., ex variis MSS”.

T. J. CAMPBELL


Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us