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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Nicolas de Bralion

French Oratorian and ecclesiastical writer (1600-1672)

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Bralion, NICOLAS BE, a French Oratorian and ecclesiastical writer, b. at Chars-en-Vexin, France, c. 1600; d. at Paris, May 11, 1672. He joined the Paris Oratory in 1619, and, in 1625, went to Rome, where he remained fifteen years at San Luigi dei Francesi, then an Oratorian establishment, devoting his time to research and literary work. There he published an Italian translation of Cardinal de Berulle’s “Elevation” (1640) and of a portion of Ribadeniera’s “Saintly Lives”. He returned to Paris about 1640 and spent the rest of his life at the Church of St. Honore. Among other works he published “Vie de St. Nicholas, archeveque de Myre” (1646); “Pallium Archiepiscopale” (1648—the first serious study published in France on the significance, tradition, and use of that vestment); “Histoire chretienne” (1656); “La curiosite de rune et l’autre Rome” (1655-59); “Caremoniale Canonicorum” (1657—a practical guide on Roman lines); “Histoire de la sainte chapelle de Lorette” (1665).

JOHN B. PETERSON


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