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Modra

Titular see of Bithynia Secunda, suffragan of Nicxa

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Modra, a titular see of Bithynia Secunda, suffragan of Nicxa. The city of Modra figures only in Strabo (XII, 543), who places it in Phrygia Epicteta, at the sources of the Gallus. It was probably situated at or near Aine Gueul, in the vilayet of Broussa. The region is called Medrena by Theophanes the Chronographer and Constantine Porphyrogenitus (De the-mat., vi). Several “Notitiae episcopatuum” mention the See of Medrena, or Mela. The name of this second place is also written Melina, and was called for a time Justinianopolis Nova in honor of Justinian. As from the twelfth century we find only Melagina, Melangeia, or Melania, it is evident that the earlier Mela is the Malagina often mentioned by Byzantine historians as the first large station of the imperial armies in Asia Minor on the road from Constantinople to Dorylaeum, and an important strategic point. This city must have been located between Lefke and Vezirkhan, two railway stations on the ConstantinopleBagdad line. The bishops recorded are: Macedonius of Justinianopolis Nova, present at the Council of Constantinople (555); Theodorus of Justinianopolis Nova or Mela, present at Constantinople (680); Nectarius, or Nicetas of Mela, present at Nicaea (787); Constantius of Mela, present at Constantinople (869); Paul of Mela, present at Constantinople (879); John of Malagina (1256); Constantine of Melangeia (thirteenth century); N. of Melaneia (1401).

S. PETRIDES


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