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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

John Francis Edward Acton

Sixth Baronet of the name, son of a Shropshire physician, b. at Besancon, 3 June, 1736; d. at Palermo, 12 August, 1811

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Acton, JOHN FRANCIS EDWARD, sixth Baronet of the name, son of a Shropshire physician, b. at Besancon, June 3, 1736; d. at Palermo, August 12, 1811. He entered the military service of the Duke of Tuscany, and distinguished himself in the Algerine war in 1775, during which he rescued 4,000 Spaniards from the Corsairs. Since 1779 he was engaged in the reorganization of the Neapolitan navy. He became a favorite of Queen Caroline and was made successively minister of the marine, of finance, and prime minister of the kingdom to which he rendered notable services. When the Parthenopeian Republic was established by the French at Naples in 1798, Acton fled. After the restoration of the Bourbons he was temporarily reinstated, but was removed in 1806, and retired to Palermo.

THOMAS J. SHAHAN


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