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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Johann Bollig

Orientalist (1821-1895)

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Bollig, JOHANN, distinguished Orientalist, b. near Duren in Rhenish Prussia, August 23, 1821; d. at Rome in 1895. He studied theology and Semitic languages at Rome, where he entered the Society of Jesus in 1853. In 1862-63 he sojourned in Syria as professor of theology for the native seminaries, at the same time pursuing his researches in Oriental literature. After his return to Rome, he was appointed professor of Arabic and Sanskrit at the Roman College (afterwards the Gregorian University) and at the Sapienza. He was a member of the commission appointed by Pius IX to arrange the details of the Vatican Council and acted as pontifical theologian during the Council. For many years he was Consultor of the Congregation of the Propaganda for Oriental affairs. In 1880 he was appointed Prefect of the Vatican Library, which office he held till his death. Among his published works are: “Brevis Chrestomathia arabica” (Rome, 1882); “Sti. Gregorii lib. carm. iambic.”, an ancient Syriac translation (Beirut, 1895). He left many unpublished writings on Oriental philology.

B. GULDNER


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