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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Jean Cabassut

French theologian and priest of the Oratory, b. at Aix in 1604, d. there, 1685

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Cabassut (CABASSUTIUS), JEAN, French theologian and priest of the Oratory, b. at Aix in 1604, d. there, 1685. He excelled equally in learning and holiness of life. He entered the Oratory at the age of twenty-one and though devoted to his labor he was always ready to interrupt even his most favorite study to assist the needy. He had taught canon law at Avignon for some time, when Cardinal Grimaldi, Archbishop of Aix, took him as companion to Rome, where Father Cabassut remained about eighteen months. Returning to Aix, he became a distinguished writer on questions of ecclesiastical history, canon law, and moral theology. St. Alphonsus considers him classical. He was a probabihorist in his moral solutions. The following of his works are worthy of note: “Notitia Conciliorum” (Lyons, 1668). Cardinal Grimaldi induced the writer to enlarge this work and publish it under the title, “Notitia ecclesiastica historiarum, conciliorum et canonum invicem collatorum”, etc. (Lyons, 1680, and other dates; Munich, 1758; Tournai, 1851, 3 vols.). Often modified and enlarged, it was once, under the title “Cabassutius”, an authority for the history of councils. A compendium of the “Notitia” appeared at Louvain, 1776. “Theoria et Praxis Juris Canonici” etc. (Lyons, 1660, and other dates; Rouen, 1703; Venice, 1757).

A. J. MAAS


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