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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Ignatius Carbonnelle

Professor of mathematics and science and editor; b. at Tournai, Belgium, 1 Feb. 1829; d. at Brussels, March 4, 1889

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Carbonnelle, IGNATIUS, professor of mathematics and science, writer on mathematical and scientific subjects, and editor; b. at Tournai, Belgium, February 1 1829; d. at Brussels, March 4, 1889. He entered the Society of Jesus September 8 1844, applying himself to mathematical studies and contributing papers to the “Bulletins de l’academie royale de Belgique”. After his ordination to the priesthood he spent six years, 1861 to 1867, teaching at Calcutta and was the first editor of the “Indo-European Correspondence”, 1865-1867. On his return to Europe he became professor of mathematics and astronomy at Louvain, but was soon appointed to the staff of “Etudes” and thereafter was allowed to devote his time to writing. He published many articles in “Etudes”, the “Revue catholique”, the “Annales de la societe scientifique de Bruxelles” and the “Revue des questions scientifiques”. In 1875 he founded the Scientific Society of Brussels, of which he became secretary in 1877, and from that year until his death he was editor of “Annales” and the “Revue”. Some of his essays were republished under the title, “Les confins de la science et de la philosophic” (second edition in 2 vols., Paris, 1881).

JOHN CORBETT


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