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Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Gabriel Lalemant

Jesuit missionary, b. at Paris, November 17, 1587; d. there, November 18, 1674

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Lalemant, GABRIEL, Jesuit missionary, b. at Paris, October 10, 1610; d. in the Huron country, March 17, 1649. He was the nephew of Charles and Jerome Lalemant, and became a Jesuit at Paris, March 24, 1630. He arrived in Canada, September 20, 1646, and after remaining in Quebec for two years, was sent to the Huron missions as de Brebeuf’s assistant. He was scarcely there a month when the Iroquois attacked the settlement of St. Ignatius which they burned, and then descended on the mission of St. Louis where they found de Brebeuf and Lalemant. After setting fire to the village and killing many of the inhabitants, they led the two priests back to St. Ignatius where they were tied to stakes and after horrible torture put to death. Lalemant stood by while his companion was being killed. De Brebeuf expired at three in the afternoon. Lalemant’s suffering began at six that evening and lasted until nine o’clock next morning. When the Iroquois withdrew, the bodies of the two priests were carried over to St. Mary’s where they were interred. Some of the relics of Lalemant were subsequently carried to Quebec.

T. J. CAMPBELL


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