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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Etienne Agard de Champs

Jesuit theologian and author (1613-1701)

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Champs, ETIENNE AGARD DE, a distinguished theologian and author, b. at Bourges, September 2, 1613; d. at Paris (according to De Backer, at La Fleche), July 31, 1701. He entered the Jesuit novitiate in 1630, and later, in Paris, was professor of rhetoric, philosophy, and theology; he was rector at Rennes, thrice rector at Paris, head of the professed house, twice provincial of France, and once provincial of Lyons. Jansenism, the one topic of debate in the France of his day, is the theme of all his books.

Writing under the name of Richard Antonills, he composed: “Defensio Censure Sacrae Facultatis Parisiensis—seu Disputatio Theologica de libero arbitrio” (Paris, 1645). This solid treatise was well received, and went through five editions in two years. It called forth a reply from Vincent Lenis in his “Theriaca” (Paris, 1648), which occasioned the “Antonii Ricardi Theologi Responsio ad objectiones Vincentianas” (Paris, 1648). He defends the Sorbonne in his “De Haeresi Janseniana,” (1654). Among his other works the best known is “Le secret du Jansenisme decouvert et refute par un Docteur Catholique” (Paris, 1651).

LEO F. O’NEIL


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