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Diocese of Borgo San-Donnino

Italian diocese

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Borgo San-Donnino, Diocese of, in the province of Parma, Italy. The city takes its name from St. Domninus, who fled to that place during the persecution of Maximian (286-305) and suffered martyrdom. It did not become an episcopal see until 1601, under Clement VIII, having until then been governed ecclesiastically by a provost with full faculties, subject directly to the Holy See. The last provost, Papiro Picedi da Castel Vezzano, was the first Bishop of Borgo San-Donnino. The cathedral, dating from the twelfth century, is a beautiful monument of Romanesque architecture; its facade, however, is still unfinished. Among the notable occupants of this see have been: Alfonso Pozzi (1620), a learned and zealous man; Ranuccio Scoti (1626), several times papal nuncio under Urban VIII, particularly to Switzerland; Filippo Casoni (1650), who urged Ughelli to write his “Italia Sacra”; Alessandro Parravicim, a Benedictine (1660); Gaetano Garimberti (1675) who enlarged the episcopal residence and enriched the cathedral with gifts of sacred vessels and furnishings; Alessandro Roncovieri (1700), distinguished for his zeal and charity; Gerardo Giandemaria (1719), who held a diocesan synod the wise decrees of which are still in force; Girolamo Baiardi (1753), who restored the episcopal residence and founded a hospital; Alessandro Garimberti (1776) who was distinguished for his prudent conduct during the French invasion, and who left his library to the seminary. This diocese has a population of 60,400, with 54 parishes, 76 churches and chapels, 100 secular priests, 10 regulars, and 70 seminarians.

U. BENIGNI


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