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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Diocese of Ascoli-Piceno

Italian diocese

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Ascoli-Piceno, the Diocese of, comprising sixteen towns in the Province of Ascoli-Piceno, two in that of Aquila, and two in that of Teramo, Italy. It is under the immediate jurisdiction of the Holy See. “Ascoli-Piceno is one of the cities of Italy“, says Harnack (Die Mission, etc., Leipzig, 502), “which, because of its importance, we may believe has had a Christian community and a bishopric from the middle of the third century, when at the Synod held by Pope Cornelius in Rome sixty bishops were present” (Eus., VI, xliii). The traces of this bishopric, however, do not appear until the fourth century: St. Emidius, martyred under Diocletian; Claudius, present at the Synod of Rimini (Arian Controversy, 359), and, in the fifth century, Lusentius, present at the Synod of Milan which sent the famous letter to Pope Leo I (440-461), were Bishops of Ascoli. Worthy of note in Ascoli, from an artistic standpoint, is the baptistery dating from the twelfth century. One of its bishops, Giulio de’ Medici, afterwards became Pope Clement VII (1523-34). The political importance of his pontificate, during the struggle between Charles V and Francis I is well known. Ascoli-Piceno contains 167 parishes; 305 churches, chapels, and oratories; 206 secular priests; 150 seminarians; 15 regular priests, 6 lay brothers; 126 religious (women); 118 confraternities, and a population of 120,210.

ERNESTO BUONAIUTI


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