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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Bernard Andre (Andreas)

Friar, poet laureate of England, chronographer

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Andre’ (ANDREAS), BERNARD, native of Toulouse, Austin friar, poet laureate of England, and chronographer of the reign of Henry VII (1485-1509). He was tutor to Prince Arthur, and probably had a share in the education of Henry VIII. He was also a tutor at Oxford, and seems to have been blind. His “Historia Henrici Septimi” was edited (1858) by Mr. James Gairdner, who says of Andre’s chronicle of events to the Cornish revolt of 1497 that it is valuable “only as one of the very few sources of contemporary information in a particularly obscure period”. His writings are mostly in Latin, and betray in a marked and typical way the influence of the contemporary Renaissance, both as to thought and diction.

THOMAS J. SHAHAN


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