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Atto of Pistoia

Bishop of Pistoia (1070-1155)

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Atto of Pistoia, b. at Badajoz in Spain, 1070; d. May 22, 1155. He became Abbot of Vallombrosa (Tuscany) in 1105, and in 1135 was made Bishop of Pistoia. He wrote lives of St. John Gualbert and of St. Bernard of Vallombrosa, Bishop of Parma. In 1145 he transferred to Pistoia certain relics of St. James of Compostella. His correspondence on that occasion is found in Ughelli, “Italia Sacra”, VII, 296.

THOMAS J. SHEEHAN


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