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Adoro Te Devote

Hymn written c. 1260

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Adoro Te Devote (I adore Thee devoutly), a hymn sometimes styled Rhythmus, or Oratio, S. Thomae (sc. Aquinatis) written c. 1260 (?), which forms no part of the Office or Mass of the Blessed Sacrament, although found in the Roman Missal (In gratiarum actione post missam) with 100 days indulgence for priests (subsequently extended to all the faithful by decree of the S. C. Indulgent., June 17, 1895). It is also found commonly in prayer and hymnbooks. It has received sixteen translations into English verse. The Latin text, with English translation, may be found in the Baltimore “Manual of Prayers” (659, 660). Either one of two refrains is inserted after each quatrain (a variation of one of which is in the Manual), but originally the hymn lacked the refrain.

H. T. HENRY


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