Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Abbey of Corvey

Benedictine monastery in the Diocese of Paderborn in Westphalia, founded c. 820 from Corbie in Picardy

Click to enlarge

Corvey, Abbey of (also called NEW CORRIE), a Benedictine monastery in the Diocese of Paderborn in Westphalia, founded c. 820 from Corbie in Picardy, (I, 979) by the Emperor Louis the Pious and St. Adelhard, Abbot of the older Corbie, from which the new foundation derived its name. Corvey soon became famous, and its abbots ranked as princes of the empire. In its school were cultivated all the arts and sciences, and it produced many celebrated scholars. To it the world is indebted for the preservation of the first five books of the “Annals” of Tacitus. From its cloisters went forth a stream of missionaries who evangelized Northern Europe, chief amongst them being Ansgar, the Apostle of Scandinavia. Here, too, Widukind is believed to have written his history of the Saxons (see Saxons), and the “Annales Corbejenses”, which issued from the same scriptorium, figure largely in the “Monumenta Germanise” collected by Pertz. (These “Annales” must not be confounded with the forged “Chronicon Corbejense” which appeared in the nineteenth century.) The Cosa school of Corvey declined after the fifteenth century, but the abbey itself continued until 1803, when it was secularized and given to the family of Oranje-Nassau. them, he secured de la Cosa’s services as cartographer The famous abbey library has long since been dispersed.

G. CYPRIAN ALSTON


Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us