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Thomas Louis Green

English priest and controversialist; b. 1799; d. 1883

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Green, Thomas Louis, priest and controversialist; b. at Stourbridge, Worcestershire, 1799; d. at Newport, Shropshire, February 27, 1883. He was the son of Francis Green of Solihull Lodge, Warwickshire, and as a boy was entrusted to the care of Bishop Milner, by whom he was sent to Sedgley Park School, and afterwards in 1813 to Oscott. Having completed his theological studies there, he was ordained priest in February, 1825, and remained at the college as procurator. In. 1828 he succeeded the Rev. J. McDonnell at Norwich, where he became known as a controversialist. Challenged to a public disputation, Green declined on the ground that no real good would be effected, but harm would arise owing to the excited and prejudiced feelings prevalent. He, however, undertook to meet all charges in a course of sermons, which he did successfully. After two years he went to Tixall, Staffordshire as chaplain to Sir Clifford Constable, Baronet, and while there was engaged in a controversy with the Anglican clergyman, in which he strove, though fruitlessly, to have the Anglican burial service omitted in cases of the interment of Catholics in the parish churchyard. In 1846 he went back to Oscott as prefect of discipline, a post which he held for two years before becoming chaplain to St. Mary’s Priory, Princethorpe, near Coventry. He was priest at Mawley,. Shropshire, in 1858, and at Madeley, Shropshire, in 1859, while in 1860 he became chaplain to Lord Acton at Aldenham Park, near Bridgnorth, Shropshire, where he remained for the rest of his active life. In 1868 Pius IX granted him the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity in recognition of his services. He retired shortly before he died to Salter’s Hall, New-port, Shropshire.

His works were: “A series of Discourses on the principal controverted points of Catholic Doctrine delivered at. Norwich” (Norwich, 1830), reprinted under the title “Argumentative Discourses” in 1837; “A Correspondence between the Protestant Rector of Tixall and the Catholic Chaplain of Sir Clifford Constable” (Stafford, 1834); “A Letter addressed to Rev. Clement Leigh” (London, 1836); “The Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing but the Truth” (London, 1838); “The Secular Clergy Fund of the late Midland District” (London, 1853, privately printed); “Rome, Purgatory, Indulgences, Idolatry, etc.” (Bridgnorth, 1863); “Indulgences, Sacramental Absolutions and Tax Tables of the Roman Chancery and Penitentiary considered in reply to the charge of Venality” (London, 1872, 1880). He also contributed to the “Orthodox Journal”, “Catholic Magazine” and “True Tablet”.

EDWIN BURTON


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