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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Theodorus Lector

A lector attached to the Church of St. Sophia of Constantinople in the early part of the sixth century

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Theodorus Lector, a lector attached to the Church of St. Sophia of Constantinople in the early part of the sixth century. At the request of a friend he compiled in four books his “Historia Tripartita”, an epitome of the historians Socrates, Sozomen, and Theodoret, made up of excerpts from them. An imperfect copy of this work exists in MS. but it has never been published; Valesius used it, attaching perhaps too much importance to the readings he found in it, in his edition of the above-named historians. Theodorus also composed a history in two books which carried the narrative of the “Hist. Trip.” from the death of Theodosius II up to the times of Justin I. This work is unfortunately lost, but two long series of excerpts are preserved usually bearing the title Apo phon?s Nik?phorou Kallistou which, however, is spurious (De Boor, “Zeitschrift f. Kirchengesch.”, VI, 489; Preuschen in “Realenencyk. f. Prot. theol.”, s.v.); quotations also are found in the writings of St. John of Damascus and the Acts of the Seventh General Council. The history owes its value to the scantiness of our information concerning the period it treats rather than to its merits. It is full of marvellous stories. The only indications of the time when Theodore lived are the date at which his history ended and his speaking of the “holy memory” of Theodoret—he would hardly have done this after the “Three Chapters” controversy.

F. J. BACCHUS


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