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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Sir John Charles Day

Jurist, b. near Bath, England, 1826; d. June 13, 1908, at Newbury

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Day, SIR JOHN CHARLES, jurist, b. near Bath, England, 1826; d. June 13, 1908, at Newbury. He was educated at Rome and at Fribourg, finally with the Benedictines at Downside, who prepared him to graduate with honors at the London University and attain subsequent distinction at the Bar. He was called to the Middle Temple, 1849; took silk, 1872; Bencher of the Middle Temple, 1873; raised to the Bench as Judge of the Queen’s Bench Division of High Court of Justice and knighted, 1882; resigned, 1901; created Privy Councillor, 1902. His first ten years at the Bar were a constant struggle, and then his book, “Common Law Procedure Acts”, brought him fame and fortune. As a judge his severe sentences, especially for crimes of violence, made him the terror of evildoers, among whom he was in consequence nicknamed “Day of Reckoning” and “Judgment Day”. He was also eminent as an art connoisseur and his collection of pictures by painters of the Barbizon School was one of the best in England. In 1888-90 he served as a judge on the famous Parnell Special Commission. Two of his sons, Henry and Arthur, joined the Society of Jesus and a third, Samuel, selected the law. Judge Day also edited Roscoe’s “Evidence at Nisi Prius” (1870).

THOMAS F. MEEHAN


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