<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1906385056278061&ev=PageView&noscript=1" />
Skip to main content Accessibility feedback

Robert of Jumieges

Archbishop of Canterbury, d. probably on May 26, 1055

Click to enlarge

Robert of Jumieges, Archbishop of Canterbury (1051-2). Robert Champart was a Norman monk of St. Ouen at Rouen and was prior of that house when in 1037 he was elected Abbot of Jumieges. As abbot he began to build the fine Norman abbey-church, and at this time he was able to be of service to St. Edward the Confessor, then an exile. When Edward returned to England as king in 1043 Robert accompanied him and was made Bishop of London in 1044. In this capacity he became the head of the Norman party in opposition to the Saxon party under Godwin, and exerted supreme influence over the king. In 1051 Robert was appointed Archbishop of Canterbury and went to Rome for his pall, but the appointment was very unpopular among the English clergy who resented the intrusion of a foreigner into the metropolitan see. For a time he was successful in opposing Godwin even to the extent of instigating his exile, but when Godwin returned in 1052 Robert fled to Rome and was outlawed by the Witenagemot. The pope reinstated him in his see, but he could not regain possession of it, and William of Normandy made his continued exclusion one of his pretexts for invading England. The last years of his life were spent at Jumieges, but the precise date of his death has not been ascertained, though Robert de Torigni states it as May 26, 1055. The valuable liturgical MS. of the “Missal of Robert of Jumieges”, now at Rouen, was given by him, when Bishop of London to the abbey at Jumieges.

EDWIN BURTON


Related

Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission! Donate