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Quadratus

The first of the Christian apologists

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Quadratus, the first of the Christian apologists. He is said by Eusebius (Chron. ad ann. Abrah. 2041 124 A.D.) to have been a disciple of the Apostles (auditor apostolorum). He addressed a discourse to the Emperor Hadrian containing an apology for the Christian religion, during a visit which the latter made to Athens in 124 or 125. With the exception of a short passage quoted by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., IV, iii), this apology has entirely disappeared. Eusebius states (Chron.) incorrectly, however, that the appeal of Quadratus moved the emperor to issue a favorable edict. Because of the similarity of name some scholars have concluded (e.g. Bardenhewer, “Patrology“, p. 46) that Quadratui the apologist is the same person as Quadratus, a prophet mentioned elsewhere by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., III, xxxvii). The evidence, however, is toe slight to be convincing. The later references to Quadratus in Jerome and the martyrologies are all based on Eusebius or are arbitrary enlargements of his account.

PATRICK J. HEALY


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