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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Peter Cellensis

Bishop of Chartres, b. of noble parentage in Champagne; d. at Chartres, February 20, 1183

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Peter Cellensis (DE LA CELLE), Bishop of Chartres, b. of noble parentage in Champagne; d. at Chartres, February 20, 1183. He was educated in the monastery of St. Martin-des-Champs at Paris, became a Benedictine, and in 1150 was made Abbot of La Celle near Troyes, whence his surname, Cellensis. In 1162 he was appointed Abbot of St. Remy at Reims, and in 1181 he succeeded John of Salisbury as Bishop of Chartres. He was highly esteemed by men like John of Salisbury, Thomas a Becket, Archbishop Eskil, Eugene III, and especially Alexander III. His literary productions were edited by Janvier (Paris, 1671) and reprinted in P.L., CCII, 405-1146. They consist of 177 epistles, 95 sermons, and 4 treatises entitled: (I) “De panibus ad Joannem Sarisberiensem”; (2) “Mosaici tabernaculi mystiew et moralis expositionis libri duo”; (3) “De conscientia”; (4) “De disciplina claustrali ad Henricum I, Campaniae Comitem”. His epistles, which are valuable from an historical standpoint, were edited separately by Sirmond (Paris, 1613). His sermons and treatises are extremely bombastic and allegorical.

MICHAEL OTT


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