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Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Marcus Diadochus

Obscure writer of the fourth century

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Marcus Diadochus (Markos o diadochos), an obscure writer of the fourth century of whom nothing is known but his name at the head of a “Sermon against the Arians”, discovered by Wetsten in a manuscript codex of St. Athanasius at Basle and published by him at the end of his edition of Origen: “De oratione” (Basle, 1694). Another version of the same work was lent by Galliciollus to Galland and published in the “Veterum Patrum Bibliotheca”, V (Venice, 1765-1781). This is the text in P.G., LXV, 1149-1166. The sermon quotes arid expounds the usual texts, John, i, 1; Heb., i, 3; Ps. cix, 3-4; John, xiv, 6, 23, etc., and answers difficulties from Mark, xiii, 32; x, 10; Matt., xx, 23, etc.

A quite different person is Diadochus, Bishop of Photike in Epirus in the fifth century, author of a “Sermon on the Ascension” and of a hundred “Chapters on Spiritual Perfection” (P.G., LXV, 1141-1148, 1167-1212), whom Victor Vitensis praises in the prologue of his history of the Vandal persecution (Ruinart’s edition, Paris, 1694, not. 3). The two are often confounded, as in Migne.

ADRIAN FORTESCUE


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