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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Johann Nepomucene Brischar

Church historian (1819-1897)

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Brischar, JOHANN NEPOMUCENE, church historian, b. at Horb in Wurtemberg in 1819, studied theology at the University of Tubingen, was appointed parish priest of Buhl near Rottenburg in 1853, where he died in 1897. His principal work is the continuation of Count Leopold Stolberg’s “History of the Religion of Jesus Christ” of which he wrote volumes forty-five to fifty-four. His share of the work does not reach the high standard of his great predecessor. He is also the author of a work in two volumes on the controversies between Paolo Sarpi and Pallavicini, and of a monograph on Pope Innocent III. His “Catholic Pulpit Orators of Germany” in five volumes was published in Schaffhausen, in the years 1866-71. He contributed many articles to Herder‘s “Kirchenlexicon”.

B. GULDNER


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