Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Hypaepa

Titular see of Asia Minor

Click to enlarge

Hypaepa, titular see of Asia Minor, suffragan of Ephesus, was a small town on the southern slope of the Tmolus, looking towards the plain of Caystrus. Artemis Persica was worshipped there, and its women were noted for their beauty and their skill in dancing. It coined its own money until the time of Emperor Gordianus. It is now a little village in the vilayet of Smyrna, called by the Turks Tapou, though the Greeks retain the ancient name. It has ruins dating from classical and medieval times. The see survived until the thirteenth century; under Isaac Angelus Comnenus it became a metropolitan see. Lequien (Oriens Christ., I, 695) mentions six bishops: Mithres, present at the Council of Nicaea, 325; Euporus, at Ephesus, 431; Julian, at Ephesus, 449, and at Chalcedon, 451; Anthony, who abjured Monothelism at the Council of Constantinople, 680; Theophylactus, at the Council of Nica in 787; Gregory, at Constantinople, 879. To these may be added Michael, who in 1230 signed a document issued by the Patriarch Germanus II (Re-vue des etudes grecques, 1894, VII).

S. PETRIDES


Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us