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Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Dear Catholic.com visitor: Summer is here, and you may be thinking about a well-deserved vacation, family get-togethers, BBQs with neighborhood friends. More than likely, making a donation to Catholic Answers is not on your radar right now. But this is exactly the time we most need your help. The “summer slowdown” in donations is upon us, but the work of spreading the gospel and explaining and defending the Faith never takes a break. Your gift today will change lives and save souls for Christ this summer! The reward is eternal. Thank you and God bless.

Henry Bradshaw

English Benedictine and poet (d. 1513)

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Bradshaw, HENRY, English Benedictine and poet, b. in the City of Chester, England, date unknown; d. 1513. From very early years his life was spent at St. Werburgh’s monastery, with the exception of a period during which he was pursuing a course in theology at Gloucester College, Oxford. His writings are “De Antiquitate et magnificentia Urbis Cestrim”, and “Chronicon and a Life of St. Werburgh”. This second work, in English verse, includes the “Foundation of the City of Chester” and the “Chronicle of the Kings”; it fixes the year of Bradshaw’s death by a poem addressed to him, was printed by Pinson in 1521, and reedited by E. Hawkins for the Chetham Society, 1848. The poet followed mainly a Latin work then in the library of St. Werburgh, called “The True or Third Passionary”, by an author whose name was unknown to Bradshaw. His work, written not for the learned, but for the ruder classes, has been variously appraised by critics.

J. VINCENT CROWNE


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