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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. Thank you. Wishing you a blessed Lenten season.

Giulio Bartolocci

Cistercian monk and learned Hebrew scholar (1613-1687)

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Bartolocci, GIULIO, a Cistercian monk and learned Hebrew scholar, b. at Celleno in the old kingdom of Naples, April 1, 1613; d. at Rome, October 19, 1687. He began his Hebrew studies under Giovanni Battista, a converted Jew, and in 1651 was appointed professor of Hebrew and rabbinical literature at the Collegium Neophytorum at Rome and Scriptor liebraicus at the Vatican Library. It was here that he, with the assistance of Battista, collated the materials for his famous work “Bibliotheca Magna Rabbinica” which appeared in four volumes during the years 1675-93. The last volume was published by his disciple, Carlo Giuseppi Imbonati, who also published a supplementary volume in 1694. This monumental work contains an account of Jewish literature and embodies, besides its numerous bibliographical and biographical data, a number of dissertations on Jewish customs, etc. Although it has been adjudged uncritical by Richard Simon, Bartolocci’s work was adopted by Wolf as the basis of his own “Bibliotheca Hebraica”. Bartolocci died as Abbot of the monastery of St. Sebastiani ad Catacumbas in Rome.

F. X. E. ALBERT


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