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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Giovanni D’Andrea

Canonist (1275-1348)

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Andrea, GIOVANNI D’, canonist, b. at Mugello, near Florence, about 1275; d. 1348. He was educated by his father and at the University of Bologna where he afterwards became professor of canon law, after having taught at Padua and Pisa. His period of teaching extended over forty-five years. Trithemius, Baldus, Forster, and Bellarmin pay him the highest tributes and on his death during the plague in 1348 he is said to have been interred in the church of San Domenico at Bologna. His career is summed up in the epitaph: Rabbi Doctorum, Lux, Censor, normaque morum. His works are “Glossarium in VI decretalium librum” (Venice and Lyons, 1472); “Glossarium in Clementinas; Novella, sive Commentarius in decretales epistolas Gregorii IX” (Venice, 1581); “Mercuriales, sive commentarius in regulas sexti; Liber de laudibus S. Hieronymi; Additamenta ad speculum Durandi” (1347).

THOMAS WALSH


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