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Fergus, Saints

Known in the Irish martyrologies as St. Fergus Cruithneach, or the Pict.; d. about 730

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Fergus, Saint, d. about 730, known in the Irish martyrologies as St. Fergus Cruithneach, or the Pict. The Breviary of Aberdeen states that he had been a bishop for many years in Ireland when he came on a mission to Alba with some chosen priests and other clerics. He settled first near Strageath, in the present parish of Upper Strathearn, in Upper Perth, and erected three churches in that district. The churches of Strageath, Blackford, and Dolpatrick are found there today dedicated to St. Patrick. He next evangelized Caithness and established there the churches of Wick and Halkirk. Thence he crossed to Buchan in Aberdeenshire and founded a church at Lungley, a village now called St. Fergus. Lastly, he established a church at Glammis in Forfarshire. He went to Rome in 721 and was present with Sedulius and twenty other bishops at a synod in the basilica of St. Peter, convened by Gregory II. His remains were deposited in the church of Glammis and were the object of much veneration in the Middle Ages. The Abbot of Scone transferred his head to Scone church, and encased it in a costly shrine. There is an entry in the accounts of the treasurer of James IV, October, 1503, “An offerand of 13 shillings to Sanct Fergus’ heide in Scone”. The churches of Wick, Glammis, and Lungley had St. Fergus as their patron. His festival is recorded in the Martyrology of Tallaght for the 8th of September but seems to have been observed in Scotland on the 18th of November.

FERGUS, Saint, Bishop of Duleek, d. 778, mentioned by Duald MacFirbis, Annals of the Four Masters, Annals of Ulster.

FERGUS, Saint, Bishop of Downpatrick, d. 583. He was sixth in descent from Coelbad, King of Erin. He built a church or monastery called Killmbian, identified by some as Killyban, Co. Down, and afterwards was consecrated bishop and ruled the cathedral church of Druimleithglais (Down). He was probably the first bishop of that see. His feast is kept on the 30th of March.

Ten saints of this name are mentioned in the martyrology of Donegal.

C. MULCAHY


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