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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Artemon

Antitrinitarian Heresiarch (third century)

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Artemon (or ARTEMAS), mentioned as the leader of an Antitrinitarian sect at Rome, in the third century, about whose life little is known for certain. He is spoken of by Eusebius (Hist. Eccl., V, 28) as the forerunner of Paul of Samosata, an opinion confirmed by the Acts of a council held at Antioch in 264, which connect the two names as united in mutual communion and support. Eusebius (loc. cit.) and Theodoret (Hmr. Fab., I.I, 4; V, 11) describe his teaching as a denial of Our Lord’s Divinity and an assertion that He was a mere man, the falsification of Scripture, and an appeal to tradition in support of his errors. Both authors mention refutations: Eusebius an untitled work, Theodoret one known as “The Little Labyrinth“, which has been attributed to a Roman priest Caius, and more recently, to Hippolytus, the supposed author of the Philosophoumena.

FRANCIS W. GREY


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