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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Aporti

Priest, educator, and theologian (1791-1858)

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Aporti, FERRANTE, educator and theologian, b. at San Martino dell’Argine, province of Mantua, Italy, November 20, 1791; d. November 14, 1858, at Turin. After his ordination to the priesthood and a three-years’ course in Vienna, he was appointed professor of church history in the seminary of Cremona and superintendent of schools in the same city. He took a special interest in the education of poor children and opened for their benefit an infant school at Cremona (1827). The success of this undertaking led to the establishment of similar schools in various cities of Italy. Aporti visited each, encouraged the teachers and published for their guidance: “Il manuale per le scuole infantili” (Cremona, 1833), and “Sillabario per l’infanzia” (Cremona, 1837). He also gave, in the University of Turin, a course of instruction on educational methods which attracted a large number of teachers. He received from the French Government the title of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor (1846) and from Victor Emmanuel the rank of Senator (1848). He was called in 1855 to the rectorship of the University of Turin, a position which he held until shortly before his death.

E. A. PACE


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