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Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Angelo Rocca

Founder of the Angelica Library at Rome, b. at Rocca, now Arecevia, near Ancona, 1545; d. at Rome, April 8, 1620

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Rocca, ANGELO, founder of the Angelica Library at Rome, b. at Rocca, now Arecevia, near Ancona, 1545; d. at Rome, April 8, 1620. He was received at the age of seven into the Augustinian monastery at Camerino (hence also called Camers, Camerinus), studied at Perugia, Rome, Venice, and in 1577 graduated as doctor in theology from Padua. He became secretary to the superior-general of the Augustinians in 1579, was placed at the head of the Vatican printing-office in 1585, and entrusted with the superintendence of the projected editions of the Bible and the writings of the Fathers. In 1595 he was appointed sacristan in the papal chapel, and in 1605 became titular Bishop of Tagaste in Numidia. The public library of the Augustinians at Rome, formally established October 23, 1614, perpetuates his name. It is mainly to his efforts that we owe the edition the Vulgate published during the pontificate of Clemet VIII. He also edited the works of Egidio Colonna (Venice, 1581), of Agustinus Triumphus (Rome, 1582), and wrote: “Bibliothecae theologicae et scripturalis epitome” (Rome, 1594); “De Sacrosancto Christi corpore romanis pontificibus iter conficientibus praeferendo commentarius” (Rome, 1599); “De canonizatione sanctorum commentarius” (Rome, 1601); “De campanis” (Rome, 1612). An incomplete collection of his works was published in 1719 and 1745 at Rome: “Thesaurus pontificiarum sacrarumque antiquitatum necnon rituum praxium et caeremoniarium”.

N. A. WEBER


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