Skip to main contentAccessibility feedback

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Dear catholic.com visitors: This website from Catholic Answers, with all its many resources, is the world's largest source of explanations for Catholic beliefs and practices. A fully independent, lay-run, 501(c)(3) ministry that receives no funding from the institutional Church, we rely entirely on the generosity of everyday people like you to keep this website going with trustworthy , fresh, and relevant content. If everyone visiting this month gave just $1, catholic.com would be fully funded for an entire year. Do you find catholic.com helpful? Please make a gift today. SPECIAL PROMOTION FOR NEW MONTHLY DONATIONS! Thank you and God bless.

Aelnoth

Monk and biographer, c. 1100

Click to enlarge

Aelnoth, monk and biographer, of whom nothing is known except his Life of St. Canute the Martyr, written in 1109. In this work he describes himself as a priest, a native of Canterbury, and states that he has lived in Denmark for twenty-four years. This gives 1085 as the date at which he left England. In that year certain relics of St. Alban were translated to Denmark, from which fact it has been conjectured that he accompanied them. In the title of his work he is described as a monk; he was probably of the Benedictine monastery of St. Canute, in Odense. No record of his death has been preserved. His Life of St. Canute was first printed by Huitfeld in 1602, reprinted by Meursius in 1746; but the best critical edition was published by the Bollandists in their “Acta Sanctorum” (July 10), being edited by Solerius.

BERNARD WARD


Did you like this content? Please help keep us ad-free
Enjoying this content?  Please support our mission!Donatewww.catholic.com/support-us