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Thursday, Jan 30, 2014 - 7pm ET

I am Byzantine Catholic. The Orthodox deny the Immaculate Conception. I have a lot of Orthodox friends and I am wondering how best to explain the Immaculate Conception to them.

Sometimes I will go and say a rosary in front of Planned Parenthood. The other day, a passer-by began shouting at us, “Mary doesn’t save, only Jesus. You are in a false religion.”  A man in our group began arguing back. I stayed quiet and just continued to pray. Did I handle this correctly? Should I have said something?

If I have committed a mortal sin and it has been forgiven in confession, why do I need to do penance to satisfy the justice of God in regards to temporal punishment? I thought that Christ satisfied the justice of God through His passion.

Do you have some advise on how to address the Jewish claim that Isaiah 53 is a reference to the Jewish people and not to the messiah?

What is the difference between a Pentecostal and a Charismatic Catholic? I understand that one is Protestant and one is Catholic. I consider myself a charismatic Catholic, I believe all the teaching of the Catholic Church, but practice my faith at a charismatic Catholic center. Some people think this is strange of me, what do you think?

How do you approach or suggest another option to a pregnant woman who you know is planning on having an abortion? Is it overstepping my bounds to even approach her about this?

I would like some clarification on Byzantine Catholics in comparison to Eastern Orthodox.

Are there different levels of Heaven for those who are Christian and live their life following Christ’s teachings, and then those who do not live a Christian life and then are baptized just before death?

Can you explain the 10th commandment for me. I am attending a bible study and we were discussing the commandments, and I was hoping to get further explanation of the 10th.

My husband and I were looking for a resource explaining the origins of Sedevacantism, Eastern Orthodox, and Pius X sects of the church. My husband and I are trying to explain to our families why we don’t believe in them.

History of the Catholic Church: From the Apostolic Age to the Third Millennium
The history of the Catholic Church is long, complicated, and fascinating, and in History of the Catholic Church: From the Apostolic Age to the Third Millennium it is expertly and ably told by historian James Hitchcock.