Catholic Answers Blog

April 25, 2013

Matthew Warren committed suicide at age 27 on April 5. He was the son of Rick Warren, pastor of the well-known megachurch Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, California. During this time of grief and devastation for the Warren family, Rick and his wife, Kay, a couple well-known and warmly loved throughout much of the world, have been graciously flooded with condolences and prayers of support. 

Sadly, though, as I follow the aftermath of this tragedy I cannot help but see in it a second...

April 24, 2013
Harry Potter and Tom Riddle (aka "Lord Voldemort")

In the wake of grave evils, the most recent of which being the bombing at the Boston Marathon, people usually want to know, "What causes someone to do something like this?" How could two young men—one a husband and father, the other barely out of high school—plan and execute a crime that has caused three deaths and injured nearly 300 more?

Many look around for external triggers. In the...

April 24, 2013
A cave diver underwater

Cave diving is one of the most dangerous recreational sports in the world. These divers explore vast underwater cave networks that can easily become tombs to those who make just one mistake. However, the vast majority of fatalities involve individuals who were not certified in cave diving.

I think something similar happens when amateur apologists think that after reading one book they are ready to take on any challenge critics can throw at the Catholic Faith. Let me explain a bit more...

April 23, 2013

Many of you are aware that J.R.R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, was a faithful Catholic.

I’ve often seen quotes on Facebook attributed to him without knowing if they were genuine. Turns out they were.

Here are three quotes from Tolkien on the Pope and the Church, the Blessed Virgin Mary, and The Eucharist.

The Pope and the One True Church

...

April 23, 2013

In the period leading up to a conclave, the cardinals of the Church gather in a series of meetings that are known as the “general congregations.”

In these meetings, they are allowed to make brief statements—known as “interventions”—about the problems they feel need to be addressed in the Church and what kind of man the next pope should be.

Before the recent conclave, Cardinal Bergoglio gave an intervention, which didn't even last four minutes but which got the attention of his...