15 results
October 12, 2016

The reformed “Westminster Confession,” ratified in 1647, gives us a pithy statement that sums up well what is meant by “the perseverance of the saints,” or “once saved, always saved,” the fifth and final of the five points of Calvinism’s TULIP (Total depravity, Unconditional election, Limited atonement, Irresistible grace, and Perseverance of the saints):

God doth continue to forgive the sins of those that are justified, and although they can never...

November 4, 2014

Suicide is a delicate and disturbing subject.

After the recent suicide of Brittany Maynard, many people are discussing it, and some are asking perennial questions, like whether those who commit suicide are automatically lost.

While suicide can be a mortal sin, it is not always one, and the Church both prays for those who have committed suicide and encourages us not to despair of their salvation.


August 28, 2014
Image Credit: Eva Rinaldi
Two weeks ago I posted the following social media status after learning about the tragic death of Robin Williams:
January 17, 2014

This may well be the most common single question I receive concerning our Catholic Faith whether it be at conferences, via email, snail mail, or any other venue. In fact, I've answered it twice today already, so I thought I might just blog about it.

We'll begin by making clear just what we mean by "Purgatory." The Catechism of the Catholic Church teaches:


November 19, 2013

It's not uncommon to encounter the random street preacher who asks the question, “Are you saved?” He may follow up by asking, "Are you certain?" In fact, my Evangelical Christian friends have asked me this many times.

These questions find their purpose in the belief of most Evangelicals that once you have accepted Jesus as your personal Savior you can be assured of your own salvation. This is not compatible with Catholic teaching.