25 results
March 15, 2013

Nothing’s better than when an enemy begrudgingly admits that while he hates your cause, he admires the character of those who represent it.  In the first centuries of the Church, persecution was the norm and bloody campaigns led by Roman emperors such as Nero or Domitian sent many Christians to painful deaths.

I really enjoy reading early Christian history because it always challenges me to be holy in the face of obstacles to our faith. Even the enemies of the early church couldn’t...

February 27, 2013
The family of St. Therese of Lisieux

As an unrepentant history geek, I've often wondered about the less than saintly descendants of saints. Sometimes we don't have to wonder, because the saints' relationships with their immediate families are part of what demanded their heroic virtue.

Venerable Cornelia Connelly (1809-1879) was the wife of a Protestant minister who decided to convert to Catholicism and become a Catholic priest....

February 15, 2013

Pope Benedict’s renouncement of the papal office has spurred a rash of questions about the purported prophecies of St. Malachy. “Will Benedict’s successor be the last pope?” “Are we headed into a period of great tribulation?” “Will the world end soon?”

The last time we fielded so many such questions at Catholic Answers was about eight years ago, shortly after the death of Blessed John Paul II. This makes sense, because the prophecies in question concern the identities of popes from...

February 5, 2013

Like the dyslexic atheist, I don’t believe in dog.

Apparently this puts me in a minority—and a perilous one at that. For among supporters of the notion, few subjects seem to arouse as much passion as the question of whether there are pets in heaven. I think I’d rather debate Android versus Apple, or argue for the merits of baby formula in a room full of La Leche Leaguers, than tell people that they won’t be spending the hereafter cuddled up with Fido.

Advocates of heavenly...

January 30, 2013

When I first read it, years ago, I thought that Louis Chaigne's biography of Paul Claudel was the best-written biography I had ever come across. The book appeared in 1961, six years after Claudel's death at the age of 86.

Paul Claudel: The Man and the Mystic covers the three men who were Claudel: the diplomat, the poet and playwright, and the Catholic. Chaigne writes lovingly and insightfully of the man who was his friend for thirty years. By the end of the book, I felt...