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March 4, 2013
From the video for the Annual Catholic Appeal

The Diocese of Madison consists of eleven counties in southcentral and southwestern Wisconsin. It was formed in 1946 from parts of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee and the Diocese of La Crosse (which diocese is famous, at the Catholic Answers office, for having been the first bishopric of Raymond Cardinal Burke, our favorite papabile). The present bishop of Madison is Robert C. Morlino, who was appointed in 2003. His flock consists of 277,000 people, about 30 percent of the area’s total...

March 3, 2013

It is no secret that Martin Luther eliminated all works as having anything to do with our justification/salvation. In what most call his “greatest work,” The Bondage of the Will, Luther commented on St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans:

The assertion that justification is free to all that are justified leaves none to work, merit or prepare themselves… For if we are justified without works, all works are condemned, whether small or great; Paul exempts...

March 2, 2013

I recently received a jury summons in the mail. As a citizen of the United States, serving on a jury is a civic duty. U.S. Code Title 28, Part V, Chapter 121 § 1861 states that all citizens have “an obligation to serve as jurors when summoned for that purpose”.

Commonly, the role of a juror is to decide whether or not a defendant’s conduct has been acceptable under the law. In other words, a juror must judge a defendant’s behavior. Every citizen has the obligation to do this. While...

March 2, 2013

"For a bishop, as God's steward, must be blameless... he must hold firm to the sure word as taught, so that he may be able to give instruction in sound doctrine and also to confute those who contradict it. For there are many insubordiante men, empty talkers and deceivers...they must be silenced, since they are upsetting whole families by teaching for base gain what they have no right to teach."

- Titus 1:7-11

It looks like...

March 1, 2013

In the Q&A department here at Catholic Answers, year in and year out we get what I like to think of as the seasonal questions. At Christmas someone will ask "What time is the midnight Mass?" (No kidding, and not as obvious an answer as you might think in many American parishes.) At Halloween, someone will want to know if the holiday is pagan. And, at Lent, not just "someone" but everyone seems to ask "Why do Catholics eat fish on the Fridays of Lent?"

The short answer has...