70 results
September 11, 2013

If you want to pique your atheist friends, tell them that their atheism is just a “matter of faith.” They will probably respond that they have the same faith in the non-existence of God as theists have in the non-existence of Santa Claus. So what do atheists mean by the word "faith?"

New atheist Sam Harris writes in his book The End of Faith that “religious faith is simply unjustified belief in matters of ultimate concern.” Other atheists more charitably define faith...

September 4, 2013

When asked to prove atheism is true, many atheists say that they don’t have to prove anything. They say atheism is not “belief there is no God” but merely “no belief in a God.” Atheism is defined in this context as a “lack of belief” in God, and if Catholics can’t prove God exists, then a person is justified in being an atheist. But the problem with defining atheism as simply “the lack of belief in God” is that there are already another group of people who fall under that definition:...

July 31, 2013

Have you ever had a conversation with someone in which you heard what the person said, but you weren’t really listening to him?

I remember once having a disagreement while driving with my wife in which I calmly explained to her how I thought she was mistaken. I then asked her what she thought of my response. She became startled and said, “I’m sorry! I wasn’t listening, I was thinking of my next argument!” Of course, I have been guilty of doing the same thing to her...

July 17, 2013

One of the most interesting and widely discussed arguments for the existence of God is the kalam cosmological argument, which attempts to prove that it is impossible for the universe to have an infinite past. If the argument proves the universe had a beginning, then it follows that some cause that transcends the universe must have brought it into existence. The defender of the kalam argument may also advance other arguments attempting to show that the cause of the universe is God.

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July 10, 2013
Question marks

Skillfully defending the Faith doesn't always mean having the right argument or the right answers. Often, it’s just knowing how to ask the right questions.

When we rely on statements in conversations, they can unintentionally turn into speeches. Like food that is shoved down someone's throat, the knowledge we impart to people in lengthy statements is rarely retained. Instead, asking questions lets us steer our conversations towards the truth without having to “preach” the...