37 results
June 12, 2013

The creators of the iconic British science fiction show Doctor Who were not only long on imaginative whimsy but well-supplied in business savvy. The title character, a time-traveling alien with two hearts and a soft spot in both of them for adventurous Earth women, possesses the ability to regenerate himself after death—taking on a new body and personality traits but retaining his knowledge, memories, and so on...

June 5, 2013

My blog post last week elicited more feedback than I’m used to, running roughly three to one against my assertion that Catholic parents ought not to abandon the Boy Scouts of America over its recent decision no longer to exclude self-identified homosexual boys. Most of the naysayers repeated—in some cases, in more thoughtful and developed ways—the two basic objections I noted in my...

May 27, 2013

On the wall next to my desk is a small framed piece of calligraphy, a gift from a friend with a talented hand, with this passage from Psalm 127:

Lo, sons are a heritage from the LORD, the fruit of the womb a reward.

Like arrows in the hand of a warrior
are the sons of one's youth.

Happy is the man who has his quiver full of them! 

He shall not be put to shame when he speaks with his enemies in the gate...

May 13, 2013

It would seem at first that the hard work of evangelization is getting people to make the leap into the Tiber. Once they’re convicted that the Catholic Church offers the fullness of Christian truth, getting them to complete their swim across should be, relatively speaking, cake. Right?

Ye converts out there, forgive this cradle Catholic for his naiveté. Because apparently it’s not so easy—at least, so says theologian and apologist Taylor Marshall,...

May 6, 2013

When he wasn’t ideating Morlocks and alien tripods, H. G. Wells took a moment to snark that “Belloc and Chesterton have surrounded Catholicism with a kind of boozy halo.”

There’s something to that: Along with their other accomplishments as authors, speakers, and defenders of the Faith, Hilaire Belloc and G. K. Chesterton invented—or at least perfected in their time—the jolly melding of Church and tavern that celebrated God’s presence in creation from tabernacle to tankard.

...