19 results
June 21, 2013

A considerable number of Catholic youths who would never countenance the murder of an unborn child cannot see why two men (or two women) “who love each other,” as they say, should not have the right to marry. If you don’t believe me, then I’m guessing you haven’t spoken recently with a student at one of America’s diocesan high schools about something other than soccer or where he plans to go to college.

It is little wonder that so many teenagers are confused. The whole concept of a...

May 31, 2013

It is perhaps too common in our age to regard vacations as opportunities to shut down the brain and fire up the senses: Pig out, drink up, sleep in.

That may be a bit of a caricature. On the other hand, ranking among America’s top five tourist destinations is a city in the Nevada desert the economy of which profits from these and other excesses best left unmentioned.

Please do not misunderstand me. Like my friend...

May 17, 2013

In the wake of “Doctor” Kermit Gosnell’s conviction for the gruesome murders of helpless infants, abortion enthusiasts have scrambled to distance themselves from his house of horrors. Planned Parenthood officials issued an editorial applauding the conviction on the grounds that Gosnell violated “laws and regulations in the state of Pennsylvania.” They criticized the “unthinkable conditions” of his abortuary—pardon me, “clinic.”

They are silent, of course, on the central matter of...

May 10, 2013

Forty-five years ago, a quiet gentlemen from Northern Italy named Giovanni Battista Montini caused a big stir with a little pamphlet. The stir was not because his pamphlet said anything new but because many people were hoping that it would say something new, and it did not. Instead, it courageously restated what the world had known for (I do not exaggerate) thousands of years. History remembers Giovanni Battista Montini as Pope Paul VI and his pamphlet as Humanae Vitae,...

May 3, 2013

In 1910, G. K. Chesterton published What’s Wrong With the World, a book of such insight and prescience that it is more timely today than it was a century ago. The book confronted the afflictions of Chesterton's age, which, you will not be surprised to learn, are the afflictions of our own age, only today they are considerably worse. The book contains Chesterton’s quip “If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.”  (My sons love to haul that one out after cutting the grass or...