34 results
December 4, 2014

In May Gallup released a poll showing how American opinions towards the Bible have changed in the last twenty years. The poll is summarized well in the graphic to the right, but for easy reference here are the results:

 

1.  The Bible is the actual word of God and should be taken literally, word for word (-9%)

2.  The Bible is the inspired word of God, but not...

November 21, 2014

What do apologists for atheism and liberal Scripture scholars have in common? They both love to find alleged “contradictions” in Scripture. And this is no easy task, mind you, because these “contradictions” do not actually exist.

Though there are many of these alleged “contradictions,” one of the favorites of both of these camps is one that you can expect to find being re-hashed again and again on the internet:—especially now that we are approaching Christmas—the “...

September 19, 2014

He more than likely did not. It is commonly assumed that Rabbi Saul was thrown from his horse on the road to Damascus. This assumption has been reinforced by several artistic depictions, including Caravaggio’s “Conversion on the Way to Damascus” and "Conversion of St. Paul" (1601).  However, nowhere does the New Testament make mention of Saul being thrown from his horse. In fact, it doesn’t even make mention of Saul traveling by horse!

Each of the three accounts of Saul’s miraculous...

September 15, 2014

There are 235 verses in Matthew that are paralleled in Luke but not in Mark or John.

This number represents more than a fifth of Matthew and Luke, and so some scholars have proposed that there was a written source—called Q—that both Evangelists drew upon, though it is now lost.

There are, of course, other possibilities. One is that Matthew simply used Luke; another is that Luke used Matthew.

It is possible that they both used a lost written source for this material, but...

August 12, 2014

In a previous post, I looked at the hypothetical document Q, which most contemporary Bible scholars think Matthew and Luke used when they composed their Gospels.

The reason they think this is that there are 235 verses in Matthew that are paralleled in Luke but not in Mark or John.

The proposal is that there was a document in the early Church that contained (roughly)...